Recommendation X: Shell’s secret plan for a Cold War propaganda unit

British oil corporation Shell hatched plans for a secret Cold War propaganda unit, recently declassified documents reveal. In 1960, Shell commissioned a report into “communist efforts to disrupt the operations of major oil companies” across the developing world, and what private industry should do about it. The report was authored by Sir George Sinclair, a […]

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Exclusive: How Shell and BP financed Britain’s Cold War propaganda machine

“Handsome” sums were provided by BP and Shell to the Information Research Department (IRD), which was Britain’s Cold War propaganda arm between 1948 and 1977, declassified files show.  The IRD used the secret subsidies to fund British covert propaganda operations during the 1950s and 1960s across the Middle East and Africa, where Britain’s oil interests […]

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Arming the Philippines: It’s a Duterte job, but does Britain have to do it?

Thousands of people have been killed in the Philippines under President Rodrigo Duterte, but the UK has massively increased arms exports to his authoritarian regime and is prioritising trade and investment with the country — partly as a post-Brexit bulwark against China.

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Whitehall does little to stop the revolving door between politics and fossil fuel firms (Photo: Can Pac Swire / Flickr / CC)

Revealed: Dozens of UK former senior officials profit from fossil fuel corporations, rubber-stamped by Whitehall committee

New research reveals that dozens of senior UK defence, foreign office and intelligence officials find employment with oil, gas and mining corporations once they leave public office, rubber-stamped by a Whitehall committee which pays little attention to potential conflicts of interest. Such private profiting from energy companies is likely to restrict Britain from taking stronger action to address climate change.

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Britain rebuffed Nelson Mandela’s appeal for oil sanctions against Nigeria after it executed environmentalists

The British files, released under the country’s declassification rules, show that UK officials sought “to take some of the heat out of the sanctions debate” that raged after the hanging of Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight other members of Nigeria’s Ogoni community. Saro-Wiwa had led a non-violent protest campaign against pollution by Anglo-Dutch company Shell and […]

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